Is your toddler dealing with constipation or has a problem with gas while drinking cow’s milk? He or she may be allergic, a cow protein sensitivity and/or have an lactose intolerance to cow’s milk. Although they are not one in the same, your child can experience all three at the same time. It’s such a controversial topic with dieticians and was advised multiple times to try to keep cow’s milk in my child’s diet. The question they could never answer is how can I give my daughter something that is messing with her digestive health. From that day, I decided to do my research and make sure that I’m giving my child the best food that will nourish her development.

Let’s Talk About Lactose Intolerance:

Drinking cows milk was made into a simple way to get nutrients. I grew up watching and hearing so many good things about cows milk, I believed that I needed it in my diet. However, the more I drank it, the worse my reactions were to it. It’s important to know that 75% of African Americans are lactose intolerant.  Also, lactose intolerance tends to be more common among people of color.

Dr. Bola Oyeyipo, a family physician, explains what lactose intolerance is:

Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of lactose enzyme in the intestine. People who are lactose intolerant are lacking this enzyme or do not have the enzyme in a sufficient quantity.

(Check out kellymom.com for more info on lactose intolerance.)

How About Protein Sensitivity?

From GIkids.org:

Cow’s milk protein intolerance (CMPI) is defined as an abnormal reaction by the body’s immune system to protein found in cow’s milk. The immune system normally protects our bodies from harm caused by bacteria or viruses. In CMPI the immune system reacts unusually to the protein found in cow’s milk. This reaction can cause injury in the stomach and intestines.

The first thing they want us moms to do is to introduce cows milk at the age of 1. I did, and unfortunately resulted in stomach pain, constipation and gas for my little one. Then, I decided to try Lactaid and she still had severe constipation and was fussy all the time (poor thing). I immediately knew at that point she had a protein sensitivity. If you’re in the stages of adding milk while trying different foods, be sure to make a mental note of all your little one’s mood and physical changes.

Signs Your Baby May Be Allergic to Cows Milk

  • fussiness
  • colic-like symptoms
  • eczema
  • wheezing
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • hives
  • stuffy, itchy nose
  • gas

Do Babies/Toddlers Need Milk?

According to healthline.com:

The main nutritional benefits of cow’s milk are protein, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D. In one study, school-aged kids who drank milk at lunch were the only ones who met the recommended daily allowance of calcium. Toddlers can get their recommended daily allowance from two or three servings of milk per day.

However, our bodies are not made to break down milk. Although milk is a great addition to nutrition. For parents looking for an alternative without the hormones, there is a great plant-based option that provides the fortified nutrients our bodies need.

Ripple Milk Is Amazing!

Ripple Milk is by far the best plant-based milk we had yet! This milk uses a patent-pending method to harvest ultra-clean protein from peas, removing the impurities that give other plant-based milks their beany flavor and chalky texture. Unlike almond milk (normally 2g), ripple milk has 8g of protein, which is more than cows milk. Other ingredients are sunflower oil, organic cane sugar, algal oil (omega 3 fatty acids to support brain health), vitamin d2, calcium phosphate, and other vitamins and minerals. My daughter and I love the taste and we drink it and cook with it every day. I was pretty concerned that my daughter wouldn’t get the extra nutrients she needs because she’s growing so rapidly, but I’m so happy ripple milk was created for people who are vegan, vegetarian, or lactose intolerant.

Source:

https://www.ripplefoods.com/original-plant-milk/

https://www.gikids.org/content/103/en/cows-milk-protein-intolerance

https://milk.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000661

Dairy and other Food Sensitivities in Breastfed Babies

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